Nikola Tesla Discovery! (Pemf) 100 Years of Technology – Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Therapy

PEMF 100 Year History! Pulsed Electromagnetic Field History!

Five hundred years ago, Paracelsus a Swiss physician and alchemist, wondered if diseases could be manipulated by magnets, using lodestones as the best magnets available then.

But, natural lodestones are quite weak and few people paid much attention to his ideas until the discovery of carbon-steel magnets in the 1700′s. During the 1800′s, most of the discoveries relating electricity to magnetism were made by the early pioneers of our modern technical world, men such as Gauss, Weber, Faraday and Maxwell among others One of the more interesting magnetic theories postulates something called “Magnetic Field Deficiency Syndrome.” It is offered as an explanation of biomagnetic effects by Dr. Kyochi Nakagawa of Japan. The Earth’s magnetic field is not fixed in position or strength. In the last hundred years, it has weakened on the average by about 6 percent. In the last thousand years, it has fallen nearly 30 percent.

Dr. Nakagawa argues that since humans evolved in a magnetic field, it is necessary for proper health. A falling magnetic field puts us at risk and magnetic therapy makes up the deficit. The truth is, no one really understands the mechanisms by which magnetic fields affect human health.

There are many theories but very little agreement. It is a problem as complicated as a human being, concerning dozens of organs and thousands of different molecules. Just because you can’t explain something, doesn’t mean it can’t happen. For two hundred years, it has been possible to build magnets from coils of wire powered by electricity called electromagnets. Such devices can be pulsed to produce magnetic fields that change very rapidly. This opens a whole new world of medical applications since changing magnetic fields can induce tiny electrical currents in human tissue. Pulsing electromagnetic therapy is approved by the FDA to promote the healing of serious bone fractures. And powerful electromagnets are used in brain and muscle research to generate currents strong enough to fire nerves that trigger sensations and flex muscles. To date, there have been many basic research studies and many clinical trials of Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Therapy.

Historically, as far back as 1890, the American Electro-Therapeutic Association conducted annual conferences on the therapeutic use of electricity and electrical devices by physicians on ailing patients. Some involved current flow through the patient, while others were electrically powered devices. At first, only direct current (DC) devices were utilized in the medical doctor’s office for relieving pain.

PEMF has a long history dating back 100 years to Nicola Tesla

Illustrates direct influence of PEMF Simplified explanation of PEMF effects, and illustration of agglutination reversal, and enhancement of cell field strength.

More PEMF Facts and History

The Greek physician Galen noted the cleansing powers of magnetism in his book De Simplicum Medicamentorum Temperamentis Ac Facultatibus around 200 B.C. The word magnet comes from the ancient Greek magnes lithos, meaning “stone from Magnesia,” an area of Greece that was known for its volcanic rocks with magnetic attributes.

We now know the mineral in these rocks is magnetite. Magnetic therapy was already practiced in China around 2000 B.C., as recorded in The Yellow Emperor’s Book of Internal Medicine. In that ancient medical text, “magnetic stones” were advocated to correct health imbalances. (Lawrence 1998/1) In the Middle Ages magnetic treatment was delivered by placing “lodestones” on the body. Lodestones, or “guiding stones,” were so named because of their use in navigational compasses by Viking, European and Arab sailors.

At the end of the 19th century the electron was discovered and electro-magnetism was brought into the realm of science on the atomic level. Albert Einstein showed that electricity and magnetism are not discrete phenomena, but different aspects of the same phenomenon. (Encyclopedia Britannica Vol. 18 15th Ed. 1991/2) Medical textbooks included magnetism and electricity as therapeutic alternatives for insomnia, fatigue, arthritis, pain and convulsions. Magnetic boots, rings, girdles, caps and ointments were available in mail-order catalogues. At the same time Daniel David Palmer, Canadian fishmonger turned “magnetic healer” founded Palmer’s School of Magnetic Cure in Davenport, Iowa. When in 1895 he began applying short-lever manipulations to the spine with great effect, the Palmer School of Chiropractic was born.

Mention the word “magnet” and the word “therapy” together in the same sentence in North America today and many people start to backpedal. Several historical events explain why this is so. Magnetic therapy became shrouded in mystery in part because of Franz Anton Mesmer, an 18th century German physician and mathematician. He wrote his doctoral thesis on gravitational fields in human health. He postulated that the body had “magnetic poles” and that these poles move out of alignment with the universal magnetic flow causing all illness. He called magnetism within the body “animal magnetism.” His patients sometimes fainted or went into convulsions in his Paris salon, claiming that they had been “mesmerized.” Mesmer’s notions of magnetism gradually became equated with hypnotic suggestion.

Magnetic therapy as a branch of medicine and as an area of clinical research fell into further disfavor in North America as a result of the Abraham Flexner’s report on “Medical Education in the United States and Canada,” released in 1908. At the time of the Flexner Report, Drs. Will and Charlie Mayo, with their father, William Worrall Mayo, were still in the early years of the world’s first group medical practice in the Minnesota frontier town of Rochester. The Mayo Clinic was an impressive display of great wisdom and forethought. By contrast, leaches, bloodlettings, elixirs and potions were also commonplace in most other parts of the United States and Canada. The rise in power of political medicine and the shift to nearly 100% dependence on pharmaceuticals for health led to an unfortunate period of dormancy, lasting 60 years, until the mid 1970s.

Beginning immediately after World War II, Japan began generating various electromagnetic wave shapes by changing electrical currents. This modality quickly moved to Europe, first in Romania and the former Soviet Union. From 1960 to 1985, nearly every European country designed and manufactured its own magnetic therapy systems. Todorov published the first book on modern electromagnetic field therapy in 1982 in Bulgaria. This work summarized clinical observations using magnetic fields to treat 2700 patients with 33 different pathologies.

The modern clinical application of electro-biology in North America began in 1971 when Friedenberg described their success in the healing of a nonunion fracture treated with 10 micro amps of direct current delivered with stainless steel electrodes. Avoiding the invasive nature of Friedenberg’s direct currents, Dr. Andrew Bassett at Columbia University Medical Center introduced a new approach for the treatment of non-healing bone fractures and pseudarthroses that employed very specific, biphasic low frequency electromagnetic signals. Public awareness also increased in the mid-1970s amidst reports of successful enhancement of the speed and endurance of racehorses treated with electromagnetic fields. Based on the published work of Dr. Bassett, in 1979 the FDA allowed electromagnetic fields to be used in the USA for non-union and delayed union fractures. A decade later the FDA allowed the use of pulsed radiofrequency electromagnetic fields for the treatment of pain and edema in superficial soft tissues. It is now commonly accepted that weak electromagnetic fields are capable of initiating various beneficial biological processes including healing for delayed fractures, pain relief, and modulation of muscle tone and spasm.

Having healthy cells is not a passive process. Active, regular tuning-up of our cells is not only feasible, but also necessary to slow aging and reduce the risk of cell dysfunction. We are, after all, only as healthy as our cells. Imperceptible cell dysfunction that is not corrected early can lead to disease. Fine-tuning can be done daily in only minutes, using pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs). In addition, when there is a known imbalance (when symptoms are present) or there is a known disease or condition, PEMF treatments, used either alone or along with other therapies, can often help cells rebalance dysfunction faster.

PEMF works to:

· Reduce pain, inflammation, the effects of stress on the body, and platelet adhesion.

· Improve energy, circulation, blood and tissue oxygenation, sleep quality, blood pressure and cholesterol levels, the uptake of nutrients, cellular detoxification and the ability to regenerate cells.

· Balance the immune system and stimulate RNA and DNA.

· Accelerate repair of bone and soft tissue.

· Relax muscles.

PEMFs have been used extensively for decades for many conditions and medical disciplines, and results can be seen in animals as well as humans. The National Institutes of Health have made PEMFs a priority for research. In fact, many PEMF devices have already been approved by the FDA, some specifically to fuse broken bones, wound healing, pain and tissue swelling, and treat depression. Most therapeutic PEMF devices are considered safe by various standards and organizations.

What are PEMFs and how do they work?

Science teaches us that everything is energy. Energy is always dynamic and, therefore, has a frequency; it changes by the second or minute, for example, at the very least.

All energy is electromagnetic in nature. All atoms, chemicals and cells produce electromagnetic fields (EMFs). Every organ in the body produces it own signature bio electromagnetic field. Science has proven that our bodies actually project their own magnetic fields and that all 70 trillion cells in the body communicate via electromagnetic frequencies. Nothing happens in the body without an electromagnetic exchange. When the electromagnetic activity of the body ceases, life ceases.

Physics, that is, electromagnetic energy, controls chemistry. This in turn controls tissue function. Disruption of electromagnetic energy in cells causes impaired cell metabolism, whatever the initial cause. This happens anywhere in the disease process.

PEMFs address impaired chemistry and thus the function of cells – which in turn, improves health. PEMFs deliver beneficial, health-enhancing EMFs and frequencies to the cells. Low frequency PEMFs of even the weakest strengths pass right through the body, penetrating every cell, tissue, organ and even bone without being absorbed or altered! As they pass through, they stimulate most of the electrical and chemical processes in the tissues. Therapeutic PEMFs are specifically designed to positively support cellular energy, resulting in better cellular health and function.

Devices that produce PEMFs vary by a number of important features: frequency, waveform, strength, and types of stimulators. Frequencies can be simple or complex; and high, medium or low. Intensity can also be high, medium or low.

No “one-size” treatment fits all situations. Most PEMF devices help to varying degrees depending on the problem or condition, but selecting the wrong device may produce unsatisfactory results. Since the body is complex, PEMFs are ideal devices to be able get good results without needing a myriad of different treatments.

Most people recognize that oxygen, food, and water are extremely essential aspects of well being. Interestingly, very few folks understand that Magnetic Resonance Stimulation, (sometimes referred to as “MRS” or PEMF with means “Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields”), is also crucial for every living thing on Earth. Actually NASA, (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) and RKA, (the Russian Federal Space Agency), have been using MRS and PEMF Therapy to help prevent magnetic deficiency disorders in their space-traveling explorers for many years. And, since the earliest space missions, many studies have shown that living human tissue and cells absolutely need PEMF.When these magnetic fields are so important to life as we know it, why haven’t you heard of PEMF or MRS as often as you have the need to drive 8 glasses of water a day? Great question. In the past, people didn’t really need to concern themselves with PEMF.

The Earth supplied adequate amounts and people lived a lot differently than we do now. They were outdoors more often and always receiving sufficient quantities of MRS naturally.Recently, however, modern life has changed the way humans interact with nature and people have altered the Earth’s ability to produce PEMF. People have realized the benefits of PEMF Therapy and have increasingly sought out answers.In the past, man lived outside or in buildings made of natural materials, (such as huts and adobe homes).

Humans also spent a lot of time outside farming crops and hunting. But now, many people spend large quantities of time inside metal and concrete buildings. They work in them, shop in them, and go home to sleep in them. Many people no longer need to farm or hunt and may spend as little as 10% of their time actually outdoors. In the past, people travelled by horseback or on camels or other animals – outside and in touch with nature. But today, we find ourselves increasingly stuck in cars and subway cars and other metal and plastic and man-made modes of transportation. People also wear shoes, often with rubber soles rather than walking around barefoot or in shoes made from natural materials. All of these things separate us from the Earth’s natural PEMF.Additionally, the PEMF that our planet IS producing is actually about 50% weaker than it was in the 1700?s. The reasons for this decline are unclear but some scientists believe it is linked to other environmental issues.Our modern lives also bombard us with unnatural, (aka “bad”) PEMF from PCs, laptops, notebooks, cellular telephones, TVs, mp3 players and other devices.Our bodies are being assaulted on all sides and may be literally starving for PEMF. PEMF bed supplies users with all-natural,

Earth based PEMF.This device allows peoples to bask in a relaxing bath of natural PEMF which allows to recharge the body’s batteries by restoring a natural balance to the body. The PEMF has been shown to be able to increase energy, improve mental focus, reduce pain, reduce inflammation, and allow folks to sleep better at night. It has also been a successful way to help prevent certain illnesses and even helps to facilitate relaxation and enhance people’s mood.

They can be. Evidence is mounting that a new form of pollution called “electrosmog” is a very real threat because it is disruptive to cell metabolism. Manmade, unnatural EMFs come from electrical wiring and equipment, for example, power lines, communications towers, computers, TVs, cell phones – everything from the wiring in our homes to fluorescent lighting to microwave ovens, hair dryers, clock radios, electric blankets and more.

Electrosmog EMFs are not designed with the body in mind. They can be a strong inducer of stress in the body and, therefore, drain our energy. Electrosmog includes “dirty” electricity, ground currents, microwaves and radio waves. Microwaves are not only from leaky microwave ovens, but also from cell towers, cell phones and wireless equipment.

Electrosmog is all around us and can only be partially blocked. One of the best solutions is to take measures to decrease your exposure. With therapeutic PEMFs, one can purposely add beneficial balancing frequencies to the body to decrease the burden of the negative effects of electro smog.

PEMFs and Magnets: What’s the difference?

PEMFs are frequency-based, applied to either the whole body or parts of the body. PEMFs may only be needed for short periods of time, while the effects last for many hours, setting in motion cellular and whole-body changes to restore and maintain balance in metabolism and health. The body does not acclimate, or “get used to,” the healthy energy signals of therapeutic PEMFs, even if used for a long time, compared to magnets.

Stationary (or “static”), non-varying, magnetic fields from magnets have fixed strengths. They are used in mattresses, bracelets, knee wraps and the like. Most have very shallow penetration into the body, resulting in a very limited ability to affect deeper tissues, and they rarely treat all the cells of the body simultaneously. Only skilled practitioners may guide you to get the best results from these approaches.

Experience with PEMFs

There are quite a number of PEMF systems available now in the US, for daily in-home use, that can help meet your unique needs. Some are FDA-approved and many more are available over-the counter or from various experienced practitioners. Some whole-body systems have been available in the US for over a decade and have been used in Europe by tens of thousands of people for a wide variety of problems without significant negative effects for over 20 years. One PEMF system has been studied through NIH-supported research at the University of Virginia for Rheumatoid Arthritis. These whole body systems have been used worldwide, not only by health-conscious individuals for health improvement and maintenance, but also by world-class and Olympic athletes for increased endurance, enhanced performance, and faster recovery.

Explore the most affordable high intensity device used by many Doctors world-wide.Lean much more about this 21st Century medical device that is healing pain, creating wellness, with out drugs.


Nine Ideas to Help Plan My Trip to Europe

So, the stage is set for your travel plans this year. You chosen to travel to Europe because it just feels right, but you begin to panic a little because you’ve started to psych yourself out by thinking, ‘How do I plan my trip?’ After all, you’ve usually traveled domestically, and there’s a good chance that most of that was in a car for an epic road-trip. You figure if you forgot or needed something, you’d take care of it along the way or at your destination. Traveling to Europe, though, is a little different because you can’t really stop along the way over the Atlantic.

You know this is the trip you’ve been waiting for, but it can be daunting to figure out where to start. Rather than stress out too much over your travel plans, use these nine steps as a guide to help put your travel plans into perspective & keep the joy of knowing you’re going to Europe:

1. Choose A Destination – Sure, you’ve chosen Europe, but that’s a continent. You need to figure out where you’ll be visiting, so sit down & hash out a list of places you’d like to visit, the time you’d like to spend there, and how it all works on the amount of time you have for your vacation. This is a key step because you’re having to choose between places like England, France, Italy, Germany, and Spain, so take your time & don’t procrastinate.

2. Create A Budget – You’re investing money in your trip, but you don’t want to break the bank. The best way to keep your money in check is to create a budget with which to operate. This is not just for how much your trip will cost but also how much you’ll allow yourself to spend on food, souvenirs, and other spur-of-the-moment possibilities.

3. Travel Documents – You need to make sure your passport is in order, and it wouldn’t hurt to check on documentation on additional ID, prescriptions, and emergency contact information.

4. Figure Out Your Travel – If you’ve chosen to visit a particular city, you want to think of the best way to get to your lodging. Is it by train or bus? Also, since you’re flying, where will be the best airport to fly into (i.e., if going to England, Heathrow or Gatwick; if going to France, Charles de Gaulle or Paris Orly)? You also want to figure out how best to get to the places you want to check out on your trip, and this will also help you establish a home-base of sorts.

5. Make At Least One Itinerary – As you start your planning, make rough drafts of how your trip will play out with destinations, lodging, and travel. Remember that there should be drafts as in more than one. You’ll find that fine-tuning your itinerary will be vital.

6. Guidebooks – Don’t think of guidebooks as “touristy” because the purpose of them is to help tourists. Find one or two that really provide good info & use them to your advantage. “Touristy” or not, they help.

7. Too Much To Do – Since you’re making itinerary drafts, remember one key item – don’t overdo it on the activities. You’ll end up wearing yourself out which is no fun. For example, checking out France is exciting, but travel experts cite that it would be easier, depending on how much time you’re traveling, to visit a city at a time. If you’re there for a weekend, try only Paris.

8. Little Things – Start thinking about how a house-sitter or pet-sitter. You’ll also want to check on your cellphone capabilities abroad, and you certainly want to put a temporary freeze on receiving mail or ask a neighbor to pick it up for you. This also helps so that they know you’ll be out-of-town & can keep an eye out.

9. Practice Packing – In the same way you used to try on clothes for the first day of school, you want to pack what you think you need & see if it works with your luggage and your ability to actually carry your stuff around. If you’re having trouble maneuvering your luggage or you’ve packed too many things, you might want to rethink an item or two & try again.

You once thought, ‘How do I plan my trip to Europe?’ Now, with this list as a guide, your thoughts should be on more important things like having fun & making lifelong memories.